MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS OF THE FUTURE - PART ONE

MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS OF THE FUTURE - PART ONE

MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS OF THE FUTURE

We recently completed a review of a client’s Information Management System (IMS) and were asked to consider where IMS’ would be in 5-10 years time.  The following key topics could also apply to any kind of information management system, including Program and Project Methodologies.  In this three part series we show you what we forecast!

 

MOBILE FIRST

Mobile first design is an approach outlined in 2009 by Luke Wroblewski, and has been widely adopted throughout web design. He recommends that websites be designed such that they are responsive and adjust automatically to screen size.

In 2015 the amount of time people used mobile phones to access the internet overtook the desktops, and in 2016 65% of internet usage time was via mobile devices. If your IMS is access remotely, it is highly likely that the majority of users will be accessing using a mobile platform, and will expect the content to be formatted appropriately. Not just in layout, but length – they will not want to read a 100-page document in Word.

IMS content should be available in web-pages, with their downloadable counterparts being automatically generated from this content as PDFs. The structure of the content should consider mobile usage, and allow for more frequent paragraph usage. Diagrams, videos and interactive content should scale pleasantly to the size of a mobile device and should not require zooming to view the content.

 

DIVERSE CONTENT DELIVERY METHODS

According to a 2012 study commissioned by Time Inc., millennials switch media types 27 times every nonworking hour. They are used to being able to digest small concise pieces of information in a non-linear fashion.

Long documents and books of content do not allow easy non-linear navigation and structuring content in this fashion will reduce engagement not only for millennials, but for the majority of readers.

To increase take up, accessibility and consumption of content, Axess Advisory recommends implementing a more diverse range of content delivery techniques. These could include:

  • Traditional text-based content
  • Illustrations and Infographics
  • Video
  • Animations
  • Interactive tutorials
  • User generated content – in the form of comments and FAQ

In our day to day lives the way in which we learn new skills and digest information has changed tremendously in recent years. If we need to learn how to replace a tap washer we no longer need to purchase a plumbing book, or find a plumber willing to undertake the work. We simply search for a YouTube video to learn how to replace the washer, someone else has already learned to do this and has shared a video showing how to do it.

This type of peer to peer learning is not new, it’s simply a new way of delivery. Instead of asking your friends to teach you, you can watch a video. We believe the introduction of short informative videos and animations (no longer than 5 minutes in length) will improve uptake of information.

Interactive content should be used when practical application of the knowledge learned will re-enforce the message. The content should be short and focussed on delivering a specific message

 

COME BACK IN A FEW WEEKS FOR PART TWO
Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *